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Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Hindraf: Retain temple in Section 19

The banned Hindu Rights Action Front (Hindraf) is against the relocation of the 150-year-old Sri Mariamman Hindu temple from Section 19 in Shah Alam on the basis that it has “national heritage” status.

“It is the duty of the state to preserve the temple in its original location,” said Hindraf leader P Waythamoorthy in an interview via Internet phone from London where he is living in self-exile.

“Why must the temple be moved out when the laws allow it to remain where it is? Cowardice, among all parties concerned, is the only word to describe the situation which has arisen.”

Waythamoorthy was commenting on the Selangor government's announcement yesterday that another site had been found in Section 23 for the temple, after vehement objections by some residents to the location first proposed.

“The government should not create unnecessary precedents since the axe in such cases can cut both ways,” said Waythamoorthy, a lawyer before he took up activism.

“The heritage laws must be respected and not cast aside when it doesn't suit someone's politics. If we allow such things to happen, it can come back one day to hit us all again in other ways.”

Backing his claim that the temple has national heritage status, he said that it is over a century old.

“Of course, the temple may have probably started as a small shrine under a tree but over the years it would have grown and become what it is today,” said Waythamoorthy.

“The proper way to date the temple for national heritage purposes would be to dig up the (statues of the) first deities. They would have been buried, in keeping with custom, under the present ones with some items like coins bearing a date. This is for later identification purposes.”

'Get Unesco's help'

Waythamoorthy said he cannot accept that some people have more rights than others since the creation of such a situation, going by the laws and the federal constitution, would be treading on dangerous and uncharted waters.

He cited the example of Malay NGO Majlis Permuafakatan Ummah (Pewaris), which took it upon itself to erect a zinc fence in January across part of the land on which the temple is situated, to "create space" for residents' activities.

Waythamoorthy also said he has great misgivings about the role of the Malaysian Hindu Sangam and the Malaysian Indian Congress, in particular, in their response to the Section 19 temple issue.

“(But) it's not our policy to hit out at other Indian-based organisations. They have not hesitated to fall all over themselves to keep sniping at us, as they compete to please the government,” he said.

“They should re-appraise their roles instead. The people are watching them. They are not here to please the government but to fulfill their mandate. They have failed to do this.”

“Our best course is that the Section 19 temple authorities and the federal government should approach Unesco to help resolve the issue.

“This is a process in itself. Only in the case of the Azwan Dam in Egypt were priceless relics and the pyramids relocated. This is because the area was being flooded for the dam. In the case of Section 19, it is not being flooded or anything like that.”

'They were not interested in dialogue'

Melayu mudah lupa

Image

The IGP’s contract will expire on the 13th of this month. In fact, he actually retired way back in 2007 but in spite of the evidence that surfaced linking him to the Chinese crime syndicate they still extended his service on a two-year contract. Now it appears they are extending his contract yet again. Malaysians have very short memories. As Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said: Melayu mudah lupa. Maybe we need to replay some of our old reports to remind you about how Malaysia’s IGP transformed into a PIG.

THE CORRIDORS OF POWER

Raja Petra Kamarudin

Licensed’ loan sharks

Some local licensed money-lenders are using their licences obtained from the Housing and Local Government Ministry as a front to operate as loan sharks.

State Commercial Crime Investigation Department chief Asst Comm Roslee Chik said police have identified the individuals who lend money at loan sharks’ interest rates.

“There was a case when a RM1,000 loan was given but the interest rate was so high that the amount turned to RM6,000 in six months.

Unsavoury ads: ACP Roslee and officers of the MPPP enforcement unit with some of the loan sharks’ posters which they removed during the operation in the Paya Terubong area Wednesday.

“There are about 300 licensed money-lenders in Penang and 80 unlicensed money-lenders. We will be taking action against the unlicensed individuals soon,” he said after an operation to remove posters put up by loan sharks in Paya Terubong yesterday.

A total of 15 Penang Municipal Council (MPPP) officers and 10 officers from the Commercial Crime Investigation Department took part in the operation.

ACP Roslee said due to the loopholes and the lack of enforcement, loan sharks were becoming so bold that they now openly place advertisements and contact numbers on the posters.

“They register the numbers using photostat copies of dead people’s MyKad or alter the MyKad number. This makes it hard for us to track them down.

“We have received 32 reports on loan sharks since 2005 to June this year,” he said.

The Star, 16 July 2009

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Police: Ah Long heads could be politically-linked

KUALA LUMPUR, July 13 – The police have not ruled out the probability that two key members of Malaysia’s largest ‘Ah Long’ (loan shark) network could be familiar names in the political fraternity.

Initial police investigations have revealed that the two were among six people who had jointly headed the network which had international connections in drug trafficking and prostitution, among others.

The other four heads, including a datuk, are in police custody to facilitate investigations.

Bukit Aman CID director Datuk Seri Mohd Bakri Zinin said preliminary investigations on some of the network heads in custody revealed a possible involvement in politics and in other crimes like drug-trafficking, prostitution and illegal businesses.

“The network is so large that it has gone overseas (overseas links) and we need time and public help to cripple it,” he told reporters here, today.

These heads are believed to have used revenue from other criminal ventures to fund and expand their illegal money-lending activities.

Yesterday, police said that four of six key players in the ‘Ah Long’ network, including a datuk, aged between 30 and 56, were arrested.

Mohd Bakri declined to comment further on the arrests. The police have set up a special team involving the federal CID and commercial crime department to track down and destroy the network, right up to its grassroots-level.

Last month, Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Tun Hussein declared an all-out war against the ‘Ah Long’ menace and stressed that illegal money-lending activities could not be accepted or allowed to mushroom.

Bernama, 13 July 2009

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The Walls Come Crumbling Down

I have been monitoring the comments in Malaysia Today’s blogs concerning the news item on the Anti-Corruption Agency’s (ACA’s) announcement absolving the Deputy Minister of Internal Security, Johari Baharum, of corruption. Johari was alleged to have received RM5.5 million in bribes as an inducement to release three Chinese organised crime bosses from detention.

Most readers appear appalled and are up in arms that Johari was pronounced innocent. They were pretty sure he is guilty as hell and should therefore be hung upside down by his balls. Let us get one thing very clear. If anyone were to propose that a lynching team be formed to hang Johari from the nearest tree, I would be first in line to volunteer joining the mob. But it would not be for the crime of accepting bribes to release three organised crime bosses. It would be for the role he played in sabotaging Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad in the Kubang Pasu division elections last year.

Sure, I know, you are now going to tell me that Johari was just following the orders of the Umno Supreme Council that is headed by Umno President cum Malaysian Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi. Yes, I know about that meeting where Johari and the Menteri Besar of Kedah were summoned before the Umno Supreme Council and that both were ordered to ensure, by hook or by crook, that Mahathir losses the contest for the post of delegate to the Umno Annual General Assembly. I also know that the meeting was recorded and that Rais Yatim pointed out how stupid it is to put such a sensitive matter on record as the entire Umno Supreme Council would be implicated in a breach of the party Constitution and the party Code of Ethics. I also know that the Minutes were then recalled and replaced with new Minutes with three pages of this extremely incriminating evidence expunged from the new Minutes.

Nevertheless, although the records were wiped clean and the Minutes amended to expunge all evidence of the crime, Johari, notwithstanding he was merely following orders under instructions of the Umno Supreme Council, cannot be absolved of this crime. But this is his only crime as far as I know. As for the crime of receiving RM5.5 million in bribes to release three Chinese organised crime bosses, I can categorically state that he is not guilty of this. And I will relate in awhile why I say so. On how the anonymous website mysteriously emerged to accuse him of this crime, and who is behind that website, this is anybody’s guess. But I heard that the police already know who set that website up with the sole intent of implicating Johari in the crime of receiving bribes from underworld bosses. Maybe the police will soon close in on the culprits and bring them to book, which I heard was perpetuated by police officers themselves.

Anyway, Malaysia Today has done its own independent investigation to get to the bottom of the allegation against Johari. And this is what we discovered, much to our surprise. In fact, Malaysia Today is in custody of the signed Statutory Declarations of no less than half a dozen police officers and many more have indicated that they are prepared to come forward to reveal the rot in the police force and expose how the Chinese organised crime syndicate is practically running the Royal Malaysian Police (PDRM). But we shall address that matter later.

Today, we want to focus on the allegation that Johari received RM5.5 million to release three Chinese organised crime bosses. And as follows is what happened.

There is this Malay police officer holding the rank of ASP who we shall just refer to as Deep Throat, or DT for short. DT has in fact authorised Malaysia Today to reveal his name but we thought we would keep that a secret for now in the event we need him to come forward to testify in a court of law later on.

On 21 August 2006, DT, who was then based in Sabah, was promoted to the rank of ASP, backdated to 1 July 2005. This promotion, however, would involve a transfer, so DT approached his boss, DSP Chew Tham Soon, to enlist his help in the matter. DT later found out that DSP Chew had proposed that he be transferred to Johor. DT did not actually want to go to Johor. He would rather remain where he was. DSP Chew, however, persuaded DT to accept the transfer.

In November 2006, DSP Chew brought DT and DSP Wan Hassan, the Deputy Commander of the Police Training Centre in Kota Kinabalu, to Petaling Jaya to meet someone who could assist police personnel in matters of transfers and promotions. The person DT was introduced to in his office in the Amcorp Mall was BK Tan.

BK Tan then interviewed DT to get a better understanding of his background and experience. During this interview, a fat Chinese man by the name of Ah Hon entered the room and was introduced to DT as the man in-charge of the Southern Zone. Ah Hon would be contacting DT whenever the need arises.

As they were talking, Dato Othman Talib, a member of the Police Force Commission, entered the office and BK Tan left the room to greet him. This is the man who vets and recommends promotions of police officers and who has a very close relationship with BK Tan.

A short Chinese man also entered the room at about that same time. This man was introduced to DT as DSP Ng Fook Long, the man in charge of Johor who DT would be serving under. DT was assured that BK Tan has a very close and personal relationship with the IGP and that the IGP would listen to all his recommendations. In short, they were demonstrating to DT that they call the shots and nothing happens in the police force without them agreeing to it. DSP Chew also pointed out another man in the next room. This was none other than the IGP’s son who shared an office with BK Tan.

DT sat there watching while the assembly of police officers and the Chinese organised crime bosses discussed the latest transfers and promotions in the police force.

The following month, in December 2006, DT finally received confirmation of his transfer to Johor. That same day, DT received a phone call from Ah Hon enquiring as to when he would report for duty and that he should make his way to Johor as soon as possible.

Within two or three days of his confirmation of transfer to Johor, DT was advised by some other police officers who had once served in Johor to be wary of the Chinese organised crime syndicate. On 16 January 2007, DT reported for duty in Johor.

As soon as he reported for duty, Ah Hon contacted DT to inform him that his house was ready and he immediately went to inspect it. The house at Bistari Impian in Larkin belonged to a Chinese woman. When DT asked how much the rental was, he was informed that it was usually RM1,200 but for him it would be reduced to RM900. Nevertheless, he was told to not worry about the rent. He could move in first and they could sort out the matter of the rent later.

DT’s new boss, DSP Ng, told him that he can carry on and do his job except for the illegal lotteries or empat nombor ekor haram. For illegal lotteries he would have to refer to him (DSP Ng) first before taking any action.

On 28 February 2007, DT received a SMS from Ah Hon asking him to conduct raids in three localities in Kulai with instructions to make sure that he does not ‘come back empty’. DT informed DSP Ng about this and he (DSP Ng) replied that he too had received the same SMS. DT was quite upset about this turn of events. We are police officers and cannot receive instructions from the organised crime syndicate, said DT. DSP Ng did not respond but just kept quiet.

In early March 2007, DT moved out of the house that Ah Hon had arranged for him and went to look for new lodgings in Bandar Baru Uda. Realising that DT did not want to have anything more to do with the organised crime syndicate, Ah Hon sent DT a SMS apologising for instructing him to conduct the raid the month before. Thereafter, Ah Hon never contacted DT again.

That same month, DT received information about the organised crime syndicate headed by Goh Cheng Poh a.k.a Tengku that came under the jurisdiction of Ah Hon. According to the information DT received, Tengku would determine whom the police should raid. These are basically independent operators who refuse to come under the organised crime syndicate’s network and who chose to remain independent. DT was also informed that any police officer who did not play ball would immediately be transferred out of Johor and placed under cold storage. DSP Mohd Hedzir Bin Hussin and Inspector Ng Swee Min were mentioned as two such police officers who serve the organised crime syndicate.

On 28 March 2007, a team from Bukit Aman headed by DSP Zawawi went down to Johor to conduct raids in two locations at Taman Sri Putri in Kulai. 32 fax machines were confiscated and 17 people arrested in that raid. A police report detailing this raid was made in Kulai (report number 2588/2007) while another report was made in Johor Bharu Selatan (report number 7295/2007).

Resulting from this raid, three people -- Soh King Siang, Lim Chin Chai and Lee Yoke Han -- were recommended for detention under the Emergency Ordinance. Till today, the approval to detain them has not been given yet while the case-file for their boss, Tengku, could not be opened due to ‘lack of statement’. Instead, 13 police reports were made against DT alleging that he physically abused those detained and disciplinary action was instituted against him.

On 30 March 2007, DT and his team detained another three Chinese organised crime syndicate bosses under the Emergency Ordinance -- Chai Ngew, Chin Yew Fah and Tan Lee Poey. Under the Emergency Ordinance, just like under the Internal Security Act, one can be detained for up to 60 days after which one is either released or sent for further two years detention as the case may be. These three, however, were released after just nine days without DT’s knowledge. From what DT found out, the Deputy Director of the CID, Dato Khalid Abu Bakar, had ordered their release in spite of the detention order still being in force. On 29 May 2007, all the officers involved in the detention of these crime bosses were transferred out and placed in cold storage.

To cover their tracks, they had to pin the blame on a kambing hitam (sacrificial lamb). And this most unfortunate sacrificial lamb selected as the fall guy is the Deputy Minister of Internal Security, Johari Baharum. But that is all now history and water under the bridge. We all know about the allegation against Johari Baharum. What we want to know is: is Johari innocent or guilty of accepting a bribe of RM5.5 million to release these three Chinese organised crime syndicate bosses and scum of the earth? It appears, though, like he may be innocent after all. It was the CID and not the Deputy Minister who arranged for their release, and behind the backs of those who had arrested them on top of that. Well, if Johari is innocent and did not take the RM5.5 million bribe to release these three, then who did?

Yes, this is what the ACA may have to now look into. And I believe the ACA has already started interviewing those concerned to get to the bottom of the whole issue. Let us hope the ACA uncovers what Malaysia Today has uncovered. If not, then Malaysia Today may have to run a few more episodes of this series until the walls come crumbling down.

Nevertheless, we doubt that anything much will come out of the ACA investigation. The man tasked with the job of conducting the investigation is too junior and has barely been three years on the job. This man, Suhaimi, does not seem to even know the right questions to ask. We hope the ACA is not intentionally sending a man ill-equipped to do the job so that the whole thing can be botched up due to inexperience.

Malaysia Today, 13 July 2007

From cow-headed to level-headed education

By Azly Rahman

How must we re-educate those who protested in such a style against the relocation of a Hindu temple? What gross deficiencies in our educational system contributed to the creation of beings that displayed such hatred?

What then must we do to reverse the evolution of hate groups sponsored by those who wish to sustain the dying ideology of ethnic politics?

These are the difficult questions Malaysian children will inherit. In the cow-head protest there were children involved; those tender young minds who will hopefully understand what respect for race, ethnicity, and religion means. Hopefully they will be strong enough to release themselves from the shackles of hatred, after 52 years of Malaysia’s independence.

We must blame the continuing survival of communal politics for the creation of hate-based groups. Because our Independence is an illusion and Malaysia is an imagined community that is thriving on rhetoric and slogans, we have a fragile system of in-breeding of hyper-modernised politics of hate.

Because the insatiable urge for wealth and power necessitates the maintenance of ‘politics of divide-and conquer and rule through racial annihilations’, we are heading towards a brink of destruction. We will see more ‘cow-head’ antics orchestrated form time to time in order for organized chaos to reign.

We must blame the contradictions and the hypocrisy in the translation of our national educational philosophy for the display of the cow-head politics we are witnessing.

Though the philosophy, mission, and vision of our educational system is elegantly worded and loudly trumpeted, we have hidden hands orchestrating the game of divide and rule and segregation. Underneath the canopy of the elegance of the rhetoric lie structural violence; a base and superstructure of politics of race that has come to a breaking point.

The way Malaysians school their children – from pre-kindergarten to post-graduate levels – is characterised by the insistence that race-politics must be propagated by all means necessary. Narratives on what Malaysia is – drawn from kampong folks to retired professors – oftentimes reflect the same theme: maintain race-politics and let this or that race dominates.

We must blame the mainstream media as agents of race-based and racist socialisation for shaping race and class consciousness in a Malaysia badly in need of a way out of racial intolerance; a path charted wrongly for the sake of glorifying greed over virtue, wants over needs, and indoctrination over education guised in the name of blind patriotism.

The media as an extension of the state now has life of its own profiting from the manufacture of chaos and the production of conflict. In time of economic troubles when the masses are suffering while the elite are still conspicuously consuming, the media will have a ball of a time translating repressed emotion into a reason to project mass anger against this or that race.

The British colonials did a wonderful job in perception management – divide and conquer the natives and create perceptions of this or that superiority amongst them so that they will not see the bigger picture. Hitler did a good job at this too. Stir up emotions during that time of economic depression, tell repeated lies, and create an enemy of the state, and next get those millions of young Germans to join the Nazi party.

‘Indoctrinated nation’

We must also blame ourselves for not educating our children enough in matters of racial and religious tolerance. We have failed to tell our children that the Malay, Chinese, Indian, Sikh, Kadazan, Iban, and hybridised groups they see in their classrooms and in the neighborhood are fellow-Malaysians and part of what our country has evolved into.

How could our children be taught to hate this or that group when their teachers – the managers and transmitters of virtue – are of this or that race?

The cow-head politics we saw in Selangor last week is a grim picture of how our educational institution is failing to create a citizenry that celebrates diversity and willing to learn about each other’s religious belief. In essence, we have become an ‘indoctrinated’ rather than an educated nation, a furious 52-year- old rather than a forgiving one ready to meet its Maker.

As a nation we are drowning in dangerous waters; from a flash flood we created. Bahtera Merdeka is sinking. How do we save ourselves? How do we evolve out of this cow-head politics we are witnessing.

Again, we must turn to education and the radical restructuring of it. Education as a gentle profession and a powerful enterprise for social and personal progress must be restructured. Its philosophy must be recaptured.

But what philosophical orientation must we embrace? Social reconstructionism and education for spiritual capitalism perhaps. For too long we have been trumpeting ‘human capital’, ‘educational for national development’, ‘education for nation-building’ and all those fancy words we blindly borrow from the pages of work of modernisation theorists and post-industrialist theorists.

These have become meaningless. We are living with the contradictions of the manifestations of these words that have been translated into policies.

What we need is not a better educational philosophy that will make our children more sophisticated racist and aspiring robber barons. We have a generation of these already. What we need is a philosophy sound enough to create a powerful generation that will care for fellow human beings and ones that understands that the Earth’s resources are enough for one’s need and not for one’s greed, as Gandhi said.

Ah, we have made a wrong turn in history. But education is still about hope and love. Evolve we must – from cow headed to level-headed education.

Whither Perak?

By Deborah Loh
thenutgraph.com


Pakatan Rakyat Speaker V Sivakumar (left) and Barisan Nasional Speaker R Ganesan

THE Perak Pakatan Rakyat (PR)'s persistence in not legitimising the Barisan Nasional (BN) state government draws either admiration or irritation.

In part, it's a difference of opinion that reflects political alignments. The BN-aligned depict such resilience as "buat kecoh". This was aptly described in a piece in Utusan Malaysia after Perak PR assemblypersons convened a 2 Sept 2009 sitting of the House in an Ipoh hotel. For the PR, it's "lawan tetap lawan", by now a favourite battle-cry in their ceramah.

In the courts, the PR has filed suits to challenge the legitimacy of the BN's 5 Feb takeover of Perak in all aspects possible, except against the state's ruler. A Federal Court decision on who the rightful menteri besar (MB) is, is pending. Embattled PR Speaker V Sivakumar is also suing the BN-installed speaker Datuk R Ganesan. Apart from that, Sivakumar is also pursuing a judicial review of the Election Commission's decision to retain the seats of the Behrang, Changkat Jering and Jelapang assemblypersons who left the PR to become BN-friendly independents.

Symbolic of its defiance, the PR has also insisted on convening assembly sittings, first the 3 March emergency sitting under a tree, then the recent one in a hotel held six months later as required by the state constitution. It deems as illegal the 7 May sitting when Speaker Sivakumar was removed by police and the BN's Ganesan was elected — some say illegally — instead.

Amid charges of lawlessness, of being rabblerousers, and of confusing the public, what is the value of the PR's continued "theatrics"? For how long can its resilience last? Will the well of public sympathy dry up?


The tree where the emergency sitting was convened

Making a point

Clearly, the PR is not relying on the courts to resolve the impasse, and has mounted resistance at other levels. At the grassroots, regular ceramah for Perakians have been held over the past months.

But after seven months since the PR's ouster from the state government, there are views that the alliance should give their fight a rest and recoup for the next general election. After all, they already have public anger and sympathy on their side. While the PR wants to keep the injustice of the takeover alive, getting carried away with fiery rhetoric at a time when the BN federal government is attempting to regain lost ground through liberalisation policies can be a gamble.

But others feel the PR has no choice. "I think it is their duty to keep on being a pest. To remind everybody that the present Perak government was unlawfully set up by taking away a properly elected government with the use of the sultan," says Universiti Malaya associate professor of law Dr Azmi Sharom in a phone interview.

"People should know that there is a reason for their ruckus. It's not about buat kecoh or cari pasal, but a reminder that democracy should not be taken away through the use of institutions like the courts, the police or the palace, or by enticing elected representatives to cross over."


Zambry
In short, the PR cannot afford to show any acceptance of the BN state government's legitimacy. But what next, if the Federal Court decides that the BN's Datuk Seri Dr Zambry Abdul Kadir is the legitimate MB?

Dissent to continue

Sungkai assemblyperson A Sivanesan reiterates the PR's promise for fresh elections should the highest court decide in embattled MB Datuk Seri Nizar Jamaluddin's favour.

If that doesn't happen, he says the PR promises another protest when BN-installed speaker Ganesan calls for the next assembly sitting, which is due by November, or six months after the 7 May assembly.

"If we attend, it will be under protest and we will ensure that the sitting cannot proceed because Ganesan was not properly elected. He has also misled the Bar Council about his legal practice and should be disqualified," Sivanesan tells The Nut Graph over the phone.

The state constitution requires the speaker to cease his or her business or profession immediately upon election or in not more than three months, or be disqualified. Ganesan wrote a letter dated 6 Aug to inform the Bar Council that he had ceased legal practice, but his notice of cessation was filed on 17 Aug.

In other words, the PR is not likely to accept a federal court judgement that favours the BN. The PR is appealing the Court of Appeal's judgement against the High Court's decision that Nizar is the rightful MB. The coalition also considers as flawed the appellate court's interpretation of the law to allow the sultan to sack a menteri besar and to determine the majority in the assembly without a vote in the House.


Nizar (Pic courtesy of theSun)
On other counts, the BN's legitimacy is also tenuous when it comes to the three independents, Sivanesan notes. "If, on a particular issue, they happen not to vote in line with the BN, the credibility of the BN's majority will be lost." The Perak assembly has a total of 59 seats, with 28 each for the PR and the BN. While it is unlikely that the BN-friendly independents will suddenly behave independently, Sivanesan says the theoretical possibility underscores the principle of what a legitimate majority is.

Gerakan Youth chief Lim Si Pin, a Perakian, believes that the PR's continued resistance will bear fruit only if the Federal Court rules Nizar as the MB. "Then they can say that their rule of the state has been unbroken."

Lim is in favour of fresh state elections and has stated so on his blog. Still, he thinks the PR assemblypersons could be doing more "productive things" instead of whipping up sympathies.

"It is understandable that they want to do this, but I think their energies should be channelled elsewhere, like serving their constituencies," he says to The Nut Graph.

"People are sympathetic. But like the story of the boy who cried wolf, people may end up treating the PR's politics as a game. I'm looking at it from a voter's point of view. If I elected you, I rather you come see to my needs than staging assemblies," he says on the phone.

Short memories?

Does this mean the BN is hoping that voters will forget the bitterness of the takeover and the court judgements by the time the next general election rolls around?


Lim
"When times are good again, people may forget. It's hard to predict how people will vote in the next general election when other factors come into play between now and then, like if the economy rebounds," says Lim.

Indeed, it appears that this is precisely what Umno is banking on. Supreme council member Datuk Ahmad Husni Hanadzlah says the government's approach is to concentrate on people and economy-centric initiatives.

"People are starting to turn their attention to the things the government has introduced, which is only a fraction of all the things the prime minister wants to implement, so Pakatan can go ahead do whatever it wants," the Tambun Member of Parliament and finance minister II tells The Nut Graph.

He says the PR in Perak should perform its role as the opposition now and focus on development and economic issues in the state. "They should do this rather than instigate people to go against the courts."

Voting on principles?

Sivanesan, however, has faith in the fact that Perak voters' mixed ethnic composition will be positive for the PR in the next general election.

"It won't be like Manik Urai, where the BN thought they were getting back the Malay [Malaysian] votes. But Permatang Pasir disproved that. There may be a small swing of Malays back to the BN, but there will be a larger swing from non-Malay [Malaysian] voters," he asserts.

Perak's voters are 51% Malay Malaysian, 33% Chinese Malaysian, 13% Indian Malaysian, and 3% Orang Asli, notes Sivanesan.

In Perak, all the PR appears to have on its side are the ethnic percentages, and principles. In a political landscape where there's been a shortage of the latter, how Perakians vote next will say much about the progress of Malaysian political maturity. The value of the PR's continuing resistance will also be known then.

Demolition of Kg Buah Pala leaves a bitter taste

By Anil Netto,

The demolition of Kg Buah Pala, which has already begun, leaves a bitter taste.

People are more interested in ‘whacking’ the villagers for their political miscalculations and for being “greedy” because they did not jump at the offer of “double-storey terrace houses worth RM500,000″. At the same time, the developer’s greed is rarely mentioned.

The villagers, after all, are the real victims of a land grab – but they are the ones receiving the most flack. Wierd how the tables have been turned against them. Many “hardcore” Pakatan supporters just want them to disappear so they can get on with the BN vs Pakatan game. We must see the Big Picture, they argue. But they forget it is all the small little pictures like Kg Buah Pala that add up to the Big Picture.

Moving beyond the BN-Pakatan blame game, however, the loss of the village, which harkens back to a different era, when people lived more in harmony with Nature, is a source of mourning.

The demolition of this and other kampungs is a sign that the concrete jungle is taking over our increasingly unsustainable habitat.

The partisanship surrounding the Kg Buah Pala saga is disturbing. At the same time, the human rights angle is hardly mentioned, in particular, the primary rights to land and to shelter, and the right of communities to live in dignity.

Where are the partisan political supporters – Pakatan and BN – when it comes to the Penan who are engaged in a lonely struggle to protect their ancestral lands and the rainforests (what’s left of it) from the rapacious greed of logging companies? Is the silence because there is no BN vs Pakatan angle there? My posting on the Aljazeera video of the Penan received just 14 comments. Why the lack of interest towards their plight and the loss of our rainforests?

This shows that our mindset towards the downtrodden, towards marginalised communities, towards the environment has not yet changed – even after 8 March 2008. Many have simply transferred their loyalties from the BN to the Pakatan, but are still unprepared for a more sustainable model of development that does not harm marginalised communities nor damage our priceless heritage.

A-G: Cow head protesters to be charged

ImageThe Sun
by Charles Ramendran, Hemananthani Sivanandam & Eva Yeong

PETALING JAYA (Sept 7, 2009): Those who brought a cow's head to protest against the relocation of a Hindu temple will be charged with sedition and participating in an illegal assembly, Attorney-General (A-G) Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail announced today.

"Those who carried (the cow head) and spoke while stepping on the cow head will be charged under Section 4 (1) of the Sedition Act and alternatively Section 298 of the Penal Code.

"They, as well as the other demonstrators will also be facing another charge under Section 27 (5) of the Police Act for illegal assembly," said Abdul Gani.

He said (Selangor) police submitted the investigation papers on the protest by Section 23, Shah Alam, residents to him in the afternoon. "I am satisfied based on the facts and evidence gathered by police that the demonstrators should be taken to court and I have decided (to prosecute)," he said in a statement issued late this evening.

If convicted under Section 4 (1) of the Sedition Act, the offenders can be fined up to RM5,000 or be sentenced to jail for up to three years or both for the first offence.

If found guilty under Section 298 of the Penal Code, offenders face a maximum six months' jail or a fine of RM2,000.

Those found guilty under Section 27(5) of the Police Act 1967 can be fined between RM2,000 and RM10,000 as well as be jailed for up to a year.

On Aug 28, after prayers, a group of about 50 protesters, claiming to be Section 23, Shah Alam, residents, marched to the Selangor state secretariat building to protest the relocation of a 150 year-old Hindu temple from Section 19 to their neighbourhood.

The group also dragged a cow's head, stomped and spat on it. The cow is considered sacred to Hindus.

Reports and video recordings of the protest involving the cow's head ignited a storm of protest from various sections of society.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Abul Razak immediately ordered the police to take action against the group. Politicians, including from the Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Rakyat, community leaders and religious authorities condemned the protesters for being disrespectful and insensitive towards the other races in the country.

The protesters, during a meeting with Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein said they did not mean to insult Hindus but said the cow head was symbolic of the Selangor government's stupidy.
A number of police reports has also been lodged against the protesters.

A-G: Cow head protesters to be charged

ImageThe Sun
by Charles Ramendran, Hemananthani Sivanandam & Eva Yeong

PETALING JAYA (Sept 7, 2009): Those who brought a cow's head to protest against the relocation of a Hindu temple will be charged with sedition and participating in an illegal assembly, Attorney-General (A-G) Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail announced today.

"Those who carried (the cow head) and spoke while stepping on the cow head will be charged under Section 4 (1) of the Sedition Act and alternatively Section 298 of the Penal Code.

"They, as well as the other demonstrators will also be facing another charge under Section 27 (5) of the Police Act for illegal assembly," said Abdul Gani.

He said (Selangor) police submitted the investigation papers on the protest by Section 23, Shah Alam, residents to him in the afternoon. "I am satisfied based on the facts and evidence gathered by police that the demonstrators should be taken to court and I have decided (to prosecute)," he said in a statement issued late this evening.

If convicted under Section 4 (1) of the Sedition Act, the offenders can be fined up to RM5,000 or be sentenced to jail for up to three years or both for the first offence.

If found guilty under Section 298 of the Penal Code, offenders face a maximum six months' jail or a fine of RM2,000.

Those found guilty under Section 27(5) of the Police Act 1967 can be fined between RM2,000 and RM10,000 as well as be jailed for up to a year.

On Aug 28, after prayers, a group of about 50 protesters, claiming to be Section 23, Shah Alam, residents, marched to the Selangor state secretariat building to protest the relocation of a 150 year-old Hindu temple from Section 19 to their neighbourhood.

The group also dragged a cow's head, stomped and spat on it. The cow is considered sacred to Hindus.

Reports and video recordings of the protest involving the cow's head ignited a storm of protest from various sections of society.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Abul Razak immediately ordered the police to take action against the group. Politicians, including from the Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Rakyat, community leaders and religious authorities condemned the protesters for being disrespectful and insensitive towards the other races in the country.

The protesters, during a meeting with Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein said they did not mean to insult Hindus but said the cow head was symbolic of the Selangor government's stupidy.
A number of police reports has also been lodged against the protesters.

Exclusive Interview With Lim Kit Siang: “Pakatan has not yet achieved maturity.”

Image@My Sinchew (Used by permission)
by Hou Yalun/translated by Soong Phui Jee

Along the 17 months since the formation of Pakatan Rakyat, the first 12 months was a honeymoon and internals problem, including the personnel disputes within the party and frictions among the three component parties, have started to surface over the past five months.

After BN wrestled back the Perak state government, there were rumours that BN is now aiming for Selangor. Faced with internal and external problems, DAP adviser Lim Kit Siang, who is keeping an eye on BN's governance, could not help but to urge his own party members to be vigiloant to avoid being defeated before the end of their term.

Lim, like anyone else, could not have expected the 8 March general election results. But they still have to complete the promises they made to the people.

However, Pakatan is still unstable even 17 months after its formation. Its internal conflicts are the greatest pressures, as well as the greatest worry for Lim.

Lim seemed to have reservations on whether Pakatan would capture the federal govenrment in the next general elections. “To do” and “can do” are two different things. Lim is still unclear about the tendency of Chinese voters as he is clearly understands that the recent Pakatan problems have made the people wonder whether they should pin their hopes on Pakatan.

Lim admitted that Pakatan is facing the most serious crisis and if they want the people to continue support Pakatan in the next general elections, they will have to first be matured!

After the 8 March general elections, various remarks that incited racial sentiments could be heard everywhere and racial relations are still very acute and sensitive. MCA, which claimed to be the biggest Chinese based political party, is currently trapped in a party crisis. Many issues related to the Chinese community's interests have been shelved. Meanwhile, DAP, with most of its supporters are Chinese, has failed to escape from Pas' Islamic state controversy.

Pakatan's problems have surfaced one after another and Lim realised the disappointment of Pakatan's supporters, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and netizens.

Could Pakatan have another breakthrough after the 8 March general elections to take over the federal government? With the internal and external problems, even a brave politician Lim would nbot venture to guess.

The honeymoon is over

Question: Pakatan was formed right after the 8 March general elections. You said that it was a challenge. And now Pakatan has been formed for one and a half year, could you talk about the cooperation experience?

Answer: The formation of Pakatan was indeed initiated after the 8 March general elections. It was as well the people's will. We were not facing the general elections as a front but it was for the ruling in a few states. The 17 months was a test, a test to see whether Pakatan is able to deliver its promises to the people.

The people had great expectations of Pakatan in the first 12 months.

But undoubtedly, the internal and external incidents over the past five months have made many people wonder: Can we still trust Pakatan?

Internally, there are endless quarrels and externally, the ruling party has taken a series of concrete campaigns to attack Pakatan, particularly after the Perak regime change. BN has shifted its focus on Selangor. It has declared a war to Pakatan by using all the government-owned institutions.

Pakatan is currently facing a very severe test.

Q: Is there any problem among the member parties over the first 12 months of cooperation?

A: There are three different parties with different stands in Pakatan. It is impossible to have no problem at all. Most importantly, we know how to manage these problems. Inevitably, more problems surface as time passes.

Difference in views are inevitable but we must prioritise the main goals. We have a common important task, which is to drive the country's political reform, give a new hope for democracy and end a party's dominance through a two-line system. At the same time, we have to drive democratisation, making the country more transparent, fair and liberal.

The most important thing is, whether we can keep our general direction? We must think whether we want to leave the differences and take the general direction as our common goal or let the differences to cover up the general direction?

Q: The differences over the past five months have made the people wonder whether it was a right decision to support Pakatan. Does this mean that the internal differences have gone out of control?

A: We are still facing the challenge to see whether we are able to overcome the differences without losing the general direction. Therefore, we convened a meeting to reiterate the most important goal and direction for Pakatan, as well as the need to restore the people's confidence in Pakatan.

We must have a sense of crisis in facing internal and external challenges.

We have reached a consensus to reiterate the importance of Pakatan. Simultaneously, we must not ignore the phenomenon of the past few months that have made the people to lose confidence in Pakatan.

Q: Do do you know that the people have started to lose confidence in Pakatan?

A: From the remarks made by NGOs and bloggers, we can see their disappointment. Not only them, we are disappointed with our inability to solve the problems among ourselves. We think that we should not be ineffectively in resolving some of the problems. We ourselves are disappointed.

Q: Do you think that Pakatan will be able to restore the people's confidence by the next general elections?

A: If we can reflect on this issue jointly and understand that we need to restore the people's confidence, I believe that we can come out with a new situation.

Q: Do you have the confidence to solve the internal problems?

A: We all hope so, but every party must have discipline and the same focus.

Q: Do you have the same confidence in the other two parties?

A: We have reached a consensus that we should have a new start. We should give an opportunity for Pakatan to perform its best.

Q: Do you think that all of you have the sincerity?

A: All of us have the sincerity to see a new political situation. We want not only a comprehensive reform after the 8 March general elections, but as well a step further to comprehensively complete the 8 March general election effect.

Q: How much reform work have been completed since the 8 March general elections?

A: It is very hard to say. The point is, we want to truly be a people's united front and a really strong entity. We are still trying to achieve it. (By HOU YALUN/ Translated by SOONG PHUI JEE/ Sin Chew Daily)


MySinchew 2009.09.07

SOUND BITES

For the Lawyers - The Constitution and Parliament

1. When I asked whether the Constitution or Parliament came first, I just wanted to make certain. But I am sorry that most who answered were not lawyers.

2. According to Tun Suffian in his book "An Introduction to the Constitution of Malaysia", the Constitution was promulgated on Merdeka Day, 31st August 1957, i.e. before there was a Parliament. In fact the Constitution created the Parliament.

3. The question which arises is whether it is governed by the Interpretation Acts of 1948 and 1967 (Act 388) which in Part 1 section 2 under Application reads;

2. Application

(1) Subject to this section, Part I of this Act shall apply for the interpretation of and otherwise in relation to -

(a) this Act and all Acts of Parliament enacted after 18th May 1967;

(b) all laws, whether enacted before or after the commencement of this Act, revised under the Revision of Laws Act 1968

(c) all subsidiary legislation made under this Act and under Acts of Parliament enacted after the commencement of this Act;

(d) all subsidiary legislation, whether made before or after the commencement of this Act, revised under the Revision of Laws Act 1968

(e) all subsidiary legislation made after the 31st December 1968, under the laws revised under the Revision of Laws Act 1968


(2) Part 1 shall not aply for the interpretation or otherwise in relation to any written law not enumerated in subsection (1)

(3) Part 1 shall not apply where there is -

(a) expressive provision to the contrary; or

(b) something in the subject or context inconsistent with or repugnant to its application

I hope my question would be answered by a few lawyers at least.

*****
Kasitah Gaddam

(in response to comment by Amiir in KASITAH GADDAM published on Aug 20)
Amiir,

1. My friends cases are not like what happened to Anwar.

2. There was a clear-cut case against him. He was tried in a court of law and he had nine lawyers defending him.

3. He was convicted. He appealed three times. Of the 10 judges involved all except two found him guilty.

4. The two who acquitted him, in a written judgment stated that the prosecution got the date wrong but they also expressed the view that the offence had taken place probably on another day.

Tight pants' woman jailed for not paying fine

(CNN) -- A woman put on trial for wearing clothing deemed indecent by Sudanese authorities was jailed Monday for refusing to pay a court-ordered fine, her lawyer said.

Sudanese journalist Lubna Ahmed al-Hussein was facing 40 lashes for wearing trousers.

Sudanese journalist Lubna Ahmed al-Hussein was facing 40 lashes for wearing trousers.

Lubna al-Hussein had faced 40 lashes for wearing pants deemed too tight and a blouse considered too sheer. The threat of lashes was dropped when a court found her guilty but ordered instead that she pay a fine.

"She is now in jail," her attorney Nabil Adib told CNN. "She refused to pay the fine as a matter of principal."

Al-Hussein will appeal her verdict in an effort to have the conservative Muslim government's decency law declared unconstitutional, Adib said by phone from Khartoum.

"We intend to file an appeal within the next three days, but we do not know how long it will take the court of appeals to decide on the case," Adib said. "We expect it will happen in the next two to three weeks."

He said al-Hussein could be in jail for a month unless her verdict is overturned.

Al-Hussein, who was arrested in July, pleaded not guilty during her one-day trial Monday, he said. She was not allowed to call defense witnesses or present a defense case, he added.

She was sentenced to pay 500 Sudanese pounds ($209) or face a month in prison, starting immediately, the lawyer said.

"She thinks that she did not have fair trial and a conviction was wrong so she did not want to pay the fine nor let anyone else pay on her behalf," Nadib said.

Al-Hussein, a journalist who worked in the media department of the United Nations mission in Sudan, resigned from her U.N. position in order to waive her immunity as an international worker and face trial.

Police lobbed tear gas at people outside the courthouse Monday, and closed roads leading to the courthouse before the trial began, al-Hussein told CNN before the hearing.

Sudanese security forces roughly handled scores of al-Hussein supporters, injuring some and detaining 47 women, according to an eyewitness who spoke to CNN by phone.

A Sudanese official accused "the West" of interfering in the case.

Mohammed Khair, the information attaché at the Sudan Consulate in Dubai, said the international campaign surrounding the case "proves the West contributes only toward deepening (the) crisis."

The human rights organization Amnesty International had previously called for the charges to be dropped.

"The manner in which this law has been used against women is unacceptable, and the penalty called for by the law -- up to 40 lashes -- abhorrent," Tawanda Hondora, deputy director of Amnesty International's Africa program, said in a statement.

Al-Hussein was arrested along with 18 other women on July 3 at a Khartoum restaurant when police burst in and checked women for their clothing.

"I don't think she was targeted specifically," Adib said. "They attack public and private parties and groups. They are called 'morality police' and she was just a victim of a round-up." Put your questions to Dutch activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali here

At the time of her arrest, she said, she was wearing pants, a blouse and a hijab, or a headscarf worn by Muslim women.

Scores of protesters gathered outside the courtroom in Khartoum to support al-Hussein in early August, when she was last scheduled to be tried.

The demonstrators carried banners and wore headbands with the messages, "No return to the dark ages" and "No to suppressing women." Others demanded an amendment to the country's public order law that human rights activists say is vague on what constitutes indecent dress.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has said he is concerned about al-Hussein's case.

"The United Nations will make every effort to ensure that the rights of its staff members are protected," Ban said in July. "The flogging is against the international human rights standards. I call on all parties to live up to their obligations under all relevant international instruments."

In addition to the group of lawyers defending her, al-Hussein was also represented by two Egyptian defense attorneys, she said.

Simmering tension over Section 19 temple - Malaysiakini

Tension over the 150-year-old Sri Mariamman Temple in Section 19 had apparently been simmering even before the recent 'cow-head' protest over its proposed relocation to Section 23, Shah Alam.

Temple committee president A Selvakumaran today revealed that Malay NGO Majlis Permuafakatan Ummah (Pewaris) had erected a zinc fence (painted blue in photo) early this year across part of the land on which the temple is situated.

This, he said, had resulted in the loss of a 'car park' for devotees, who now find it more difficult to attend services at the temple.

“We complained about it to the police and Shah Alam City Council, but until now no action has been taken,” he said when contacted.

Worshippers now have to park their vehicles in the surrounding residential area, which causes traffic congestion especially during festivals.

“This is why we have to seek a police permit every time there is a festival, so that they can assist us with the traffic,” said Selvakumaran.

Devotees are also forced to resort to park their vehicles in the residential area on other occasions.

“Thank god, they (residents) are very understanding because they have known about (the temple's existence) for a long time,” said Selvakumaran.

However, the authorities have decided to relocate the temple, as it is within a residential area and because of traffic congestion during the observance of religious festivals.

Pewaris: It's our right

Pewaris, meanwhile, said it has a right to erect the fence as the land “belongs to the State Development Corporation (PKNS), and not to the temple”.

Pewaris spokesperson Nadzim Johan said when contacted that the fence was built to create a space for residents in the neighbourhood, for “physical activities, gatherings or ceremonies”.

“Although we were not authorised to (build the fence), they (authorities) should allow the land to be used by the residents because the temple is also borrowing the land from PKNS,” he said.

A signboard identifies the Pewaris-occupied site as Tapak Gelanggang Pewaris and states that the facility was officially opened on Jan 10.

Nadzim went on to deny that the erection of the fence has led to problems for Hindu worshippers.

“They can still park their vehicles on both sides of the road. Besides, we don't want them to expand the temple,” he added.

'Cow-head' protesters to face charges - Malaysiakini

Attorney-General Abdul Gani Patail today said that he would be charging those who took part in the 'cow-head' protest 10 days ago.
"I have decided to charge those who carried (the cow head) and spoke while stepping on the cow head under Section 4(1) of the Sedition Act, alternatively under Section 298 of the Penal Code," said Abdul Gani in a statement today.

He added that all the demonstrators will also face another charge under Section 27(5) of the Police Act for illegal assembly. [see below for details of the sections]

He said that the decision was based on the investigation paper submitted by the police to him this afternoon.

"I am satisfied based on the facts and evidence gathered by the police that the demonstrators should be taken to court," he said.

The investigation paper was the result of a two-week long police investigation into the protest which has put Malaysia on the international stage for the wrong reason after public outcry over the issue.

Abdul Gani however did not state when the charges would be preferred against the demontrators. He also did not reveal the number of people to be charged.

New site identified

On Aug 28, the demonstrators, residents of Shah Alam's Section 23, marched to the state secretariat to protest the proposed relocation of the Sri Maha Mariamman Hindu temple from nearby Section 19.

They were reportedly unhappy that the 150-year-old temple is to be relocated in the Malay-Muslim majority neighbourhood.

The protest turned sour when several unidentified men came forward with a dismembered cow's head and placed it in front of the building gates.

Several individuals then proceeded to spit and step upon the animal's head while uttering threats apparently directed at Selangor executive councillor for health, plantation workers, poverty and caring government Dr Xavier Jayakumar

An attempt by the the state government to hold a dialogue with the residents last Saturday turned rowdly (photo, above) when the residents vehemently objected to the temple being relocated to their neighbourhood.

Following this the state government shelved the plan to relocate the temple but today announced that another site has been found in Section 23 for the relocation.

Uthaya released after 12 hrs

Teoh family outraged at MACC chief's suicide theory

By Debra Chong

KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 7 – As the inquest into the death of a Selangor government political aide drags on with no clear end in sight, his grieving family’s frustration is fast turning into fury.

This is especially over the latest reported remarks made by the chief commissioner of the national anti-graft body, which many believe to have had a hand in pushing him over the edge.

The family of the late Teoh Beng Hock denounced the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission’s (MACC) Datuk Seri Ahmad Said Hamdan for publicly insinuating that the 30-year-old political secretary had committed suicide because he “could not withstand the pressure”.

Teoh’s younger sister, Lee Lan noted that Ahmad Said had told Chinese-language daily, Sin Chew Daily, earlier this month that he had been informed of 10 cases of people jumping from buildings after being investigated by Hong Kong’s Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) since its set-up.

The MACC, formed in January this year, was modelled after the ICAC.

“He also said that if people investigated could not withstand the pressure and jumped from the building, there was nothing that they (MACC) could do,” Lee Lan told The Malaysian Insider, repeating her statement to reporters last Saturday after saying prayers for her brother at the Seck Kia Eenh Temple in Malacca.

“If the MACC continues to make irresponsible remarks which cannot be substantiated with proof, we are prepared to go and see the Prime Minister again to urge him to immediately set up a comprehensive Royal Commission of Inquiry to investigate into Beng Hock’s cause of death,” she added, speaking for the rest of her family.

The family scored a meeting with Datuk Seri Najib Razak in his Putrajaya office on July 28.

“No stone will be left unturned in finding out the real cause of death and, if there is any foul play, action will definitely be taken,” the PM promised them then.

Lee Lan, who was the closest of three other siblings to Teoh, challenged Ahmad Said to answer three questions:

1. Who saw Beng Hock jump from [the] MACC building?

2. Beng Hock was classified as a witness in the investigation, what pressure would he have faced?

3. Will MACC’s interrogation method bring about pressure on the witness or suspect to cause them to jump to death?

Teoh was found dead outside the MACC’s Selangor office in Plaza Masalam, Shah Alam on July 16, the same day he was to register his marriage to his pregnant sweetheart.

He had been interrogated overnight by MACC investigators probing claims that his boss, first-term Selangor DAP state lawmaker and executive councillor Ean Yong Hian Wah, had unlawfully dipped his fingers into state funds.

The inquest will resume tomorrow after a one week break.

Lee Lan, who was the closest of three other siblings to Teoh, challenged Ahmad Said to answer three questions:

1. Who saw Beng Hock jump from [the] MACC building?

2. Beng Hock was classified as a witness in the investigation, what pressure would he have faced?

3. Will MACC’s interrogation method bring about pressure on the witness or suspect to cause them to jump to death?

Teoh was found dead outside the MACC’s Selangor office in Plaza Masalam, Shah Alam on July 16, the same day he was to register his marriage to his pregnant sweetheart.

He had been interrogated overnight by MACC investigators probing claims that his boss, first-term Selangor DAP state lawmaker and executive councillor Ean Yong Hian Wah, had unlawfully dipped his fingers into state funds.

The inquest will resume tomorrow after a one week break.

A tale of a cow

Image

And that is why one-time Selangor Menteri Besar Khir Toyo said cows are stupid. And he explained why he said this as follows. Malays have a proverb, he said, bodoh macam lembu, which translates to stupid like a cow.

NO HOLDS BARRED

Raja Petra Kamarudin

This story is actually a tale of a cow, not the tail of a cow. And the tale started when Umno lost its cash-cow state, Selangor. Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak said they must grab back the cash-cow state, by hook or by crook. And what Malaysian prime ministers want Malaysian prime ministers get.

So they moo-ted a grand plan. And the plan was to raise race and religion issues to work up the Malays so that they would become aroused enough to unite. “Apa pasal itu Moolayu selalu bangkit cerita 13 Mei?” asked a very concerned Chinese citizen of Selangor who spoke very little English and a spattering of bazaar Malay. “Itu bikin kita orang China rasa risau. Kita masih ingat dulu orang China kena sembelih macam lembu semasa Hari Raya Haji.”

Of course, one would imagine that in this day and age Malays can no longer be led by the nose like cows and get taken in so easily by all this propaganda. As they say in Malaysia, Malays, today, have better cow sense. But alas, some are still fooled by bull shit.

But then, we must always remember what one-time Malaysian Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said: people are like herd. They have herd mentality. Mahathir was of course talking about the fact that all you need to do is lead one cow by the nose and the rest of the herd would follow.

If you remember the John Wayne cowboy movies of the old days you will remember that they always showed scenes of stampeding herds. All it takes is for one cow to become spooked and to start panicking and the rest of the herd would follow suit. This is another thing about herd mentality. All it takes is for one cow to moo and start galloping and all the others would follow although they do not know why they are doing so.

So all you need to do is to spook one cow. And it need not be the lead cow. Any cow will do. And once this cow is spooked and goes moo and starts running in a panic like a bull in a China shop, then the rest of the herd just follows without thinking.

And that is why one-time Selangor Menteri Besar Khir Toyo said cows are stupid. And he explained why he said that as follows. Malays have a proverb, he said, bodoh macam lembu, which translates to stupid like a cow. So stupidity is always equated to cows, at least as far as Malays are concerned.

That was Khir Toyo’s explanation.

What Malays do not know is that the English also have cute sayings, just like the Malays. And one of the English sayings is ‘greedy like a pig’. This normally refers to people who eat too much and stuff their faces unabashedly. This would include people who eat everything they can get their hands on without a second thought -- like many Malaysians who ‘eat’ the rakyat’s money by taking ‘commission’ and ‘under the table’ money. These types of people would classify as those who are greedy like pigs.

But as much as Najib and Khir Toyo tried everything they could to bring down the Selangor government, the Pakatan Rakyat people were not in the least bit cowed. Nothing could shake them and they fought back hard. The Pakatan Rakyat people are just so pig-headed or, as the Malays would say, kepala keras macam lembu. So Umno decided to play hardball by making some of the Pakatan Rakyat EXCO Members sacrificial cows. But still they fought back relentlessly and would not surrender.

Then Umno upped the ante and got some of their members to march to the Selangor State Secretariat building with a cow’s head. They of course pretended that Umno is not involved in this entire thing and that these people acted on their own accord. But the Malays have another saying. And that saying is when one cow is muddy then the entire herd becomes muddy as well. Eventually, everyone blamed Umno for this and many in fact asked why is it that Umno does not have any cow sense. Does Umno not know that they would get blamed for this whatever they may say to deny it?

The Saturday meeting in Shah Alam convinced those who may have had doubts about Umno’s involvement in the cow head episode that Umno is undoubtedly involved. When one Umno man started shouting, the rest followed suit in true herd mentality fashion. It was almost like a stampeding herd when everyone rushed forward and it appeared like they would swamp the main table. Everyone was screaming at the same time and no one could understand what these people were saying. It was almost like the sound of cows in a slaughterhouse.

But the Menteri Besar, Tan Sri Khalid Ibrahim, and the Shah Alam Member of Parliament, Khalid Samad, remained very calm. They were not cowed by the mob that even went so far as to threaten to kill them. You could see that the two Khalids were as unperturbed as cows grazing in a field. They did not react or retaliate like a bull that sees red.

And that demonstrated the matured mentality of the Pakatan Rakyat people compared to the Umno people. Khalid even said he was prepared to be slaughtered in the next general election if that is the price he has to pay to seek justice and fair-play.

The Umno people wanted to barbecue the two Khalids like pieces of beef. But the two Khalids stood their ground and refused to give in even as the Umno people were sharpening their carving knives. Trying to get the two Khalids to relent was as difficult as trying to beat a cow into action.

And everyone who witnessed the video of the Saturday melee in Shah Alam realised that Umno is very dangerous and does not care what happens to the rakyat as long as they are able to grab back the cash-cow state that they lost on 8th March 2008.

Mad cow disease in Penang

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The look on their faces when they go berserk is something you have to personally see to appreciate. It is indeed a most ugly sight that words can never describe. The fact that most of these people are already ugly to start off with makes it even worse. (First published on 9 September 2008, one day before I was detained under the Internal Security Act).

NO HOLDS BARRED

Raja Petra Kamarudin

Researchers in University Science Malaysia (USM), Penang, have traced local beef as the source of the recent outbreak of Mad Cow Disease. According to Professor Abdool Rehman Maideen, the university decided to conduct this research when it was discovered that many Indians of the Muslim faith appeared to be acting very strange one hour after a heavy meal that comprised of beef.

“The Indians of the Hindu faith did not seem to catch this disease,” explained Professor Abdool Rehman. “It is only those Indians of the Muslim faith who got it. So we suspected that it must have something to do with their diet since many Hindus are vegetarians and most would not consume beef.”

“But what is most perplexing,” said Professor Abdool Rehman, “Malays also eat the same thing but they do not appear to be prone to this disease. In fact, many Chinese, Thais, and others as well eat local beef but how come they are immune from this disease?”

“I think we are seeing a new strain or mutated form of Mad Cow Disease. This is not the same strain that hit this country a couple of years ago. This strain hits only Indians, in this case Indians who eat beef like those Indians of the Muslim faith.”

“It may no longer be accurate to call this disease Mad Cow Disease although it does come from cows and those inflicted with the disease do act like mad cows. Our university has renamed this disease Mamak Disease in light of the fact that Mamaks seem to be the only people who suffer from this problem.”

“We did some tests on Malays and Chinese, and although they eat the same beef as the Indians of the Muslim faith, they do not appear to be prone to the disease -- and neither are Indians who are Christians. We would love to also do some tests on Indians of the Hindu faith but the problem is we can’t get them to agree to consume beef even though it is for research purposes.”

“The way those affected with this disease act is quite frightening,” said Professor Abdool Rehman. “People have been known to jump up from their chairs, try to climb walls, and they would pull down and destroy paintings and photographs. The look on their faces when they go berserk is something you have to personally see to appreciate. It is indeed a most ugly sight that words can never describe. The fact that most of these people are already ugly to start off with makes it even worse. I for one would dread to catch such a disease and that is why from now on I have become a vegetarian and shun all forms of meat.”

Pictures courtesy Kwong Wah Yit Poh

Heh, heh, heh, go ahead, make my day

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I challenge Malay Mail to make a police report against me. I was told there are already more than ten police reports piled up against me, not to mention two warrants of arrest and one Internal Security Act detention order. So what is one more police report? By the way, the police know where I am. I am not in hiding and have been in contact with many people, top Umno people included.

NO HOLDS BARRED

Raja Petra Kamarudin

Thief! Thief!

Malaysia Today stole a Malay Mail scoop. We've been working on the story for days. It's what journalists called a "Scoop" or "an Exclusive". This one by Frankie d'Cruz and Kharleez Zubin on the confession of an election rigger we've saved for today's front page because it's a damn good scoop. The people at Malaysia Today seem to think so, too.

Imagine our shock when at 1.52am, which is way before our press time, our scoop was already up on Malaysia Today! (See: http://mt.m2day.org/2008/content/view/26547/84/ )

The Malay Mail usually updates its website around noon (about the same time the print edition goes out to the streets) but today I told our IT people we might as well upload the stories earlier. After all, the Malaysia Today has scooped our scoop!

Our lawyers say this is THEFT, so we're obliged to report it in the morning.

http://rockybru.com.my/

Malay Mail exclusive hijacked

Malay Mail

Monday, September 7th, 2009 04:17:00

OUR exclusive on how former MIC strongman Datuk V. Govindaraj “stole” 30 votes meant for Datuk S. Subramaniam in the 1977 party polls was ironically stolen by online portal Malaysia Today even before Malay Mail had gone to print or had uploaded the story on its website. The story was uploaded on Malaysia Today at 1.52am.

Investigations are under way to ascertain how the story was hijacked.

http://www.mmail.com.my/content/12537-malay-mail-exclusive-hijacked

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Actually, they uploaded the article at 1.05am while Malaysia Today -- as even Malay Mail admits -- uploaded it at 1.52am. See the link of the article on Malay Mail’s website here: http://www.mmail.com.my/content/12492-dark-secret-revealed

So what is the big issue? It was already in the public domain BEFORE we ‘stole’ it. Malay Mail did not upload the article AFTER we ‘stole’ it, as they claim.